Provincial House
Prince Edward Island
Canada
July 2007


A Canadian national historic building. In 1864, a conference was held in this building that led to the formation of Canada 3 years later. The text below was lifted from the official website http://www.pc.gc.ca/lhn-nhs/pe/provincehouse/natcul/natcul1_e.asp


The Prince Edward Island Legislature first met in private homes and taverns and, as a door keeper to the legislature remarked, this made for 'a damn queer Parliament'. In 1837 the lieutenant governor, Sir John Harvey, made plain to the legislature his alarm at the colony having no building for the safe custody of its public recorde. No one could disagree, and there was warm support for a vote of 5,000 to provide a legislative building to house the two branches of the legislature, as well as colonial offices.


The cornerstone was laid in May, 1843 - a band, parade, and a speech by the lieutenant governor were some of the events marking the occasion.


The first session of the Prince Edward Island Legislature, held in the new Colonial Building in January 1847, marked the official opening of the structure. The small Island community had designed, built and furnished a major public building comparable to those in other British colonies in North America.


The Colonial building represented the epitome of Island craftmanship during the mid-19th century, a time of unprecedented prosperity and optimism.


Canada dates its birth from July 1, 1867 and its conception from September of 1864. The occasion was a conference to discuss the desirability of union of Britain's North American colonies. The place was Province House, in Charlottetown.


Unfortunately, there is no formal record of what was said during the Charlottetown meetings. What we know has been gathered from private sources, such as letters written home by delegates. We do know that there was agreement on detailed discussion of the idea of union. We know that the Maritime delegates put aside their own poorly-supported ideas of Maritime Union, while the Canadians could see solutions to their own problems in a larger union.


An impromptu fountain in front of a shop called "best of pei (prince edward island)". Not exactly the best fountain.